Reconstructed: A Music Blog
"The Cure As You’ve Never Seen Or Heard Them Before!" This advertisement originally appeared here in the December 1991 issue of Spin magazine.

"The Cure As You’ve Never Seen Or Heard Them Before!" This advertisement originally appeared here in the December 1991 issue of Spin magazine.

In the video above, Best Coast performs “Boyfriend” at the Cat’s Cradle in Carrboro, North Carolina on Friday, July 13, 2012. (Video taken by the YouTube user die0t0).

"Grungy Jumpers: A Family Tree," a handy chart helping the denizens of the early 1990’s sort out the Seattle rock scene during its mighty zenith. Use this chart to ascertain the origins of Mudhoney, Mother Love Bone, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, and other such bands. The chart originally appeared here in the September 1992 issue of Spin magazine.

"Grungy Jumpers: A Family Tree," a handy chart helping the denizens of the early 1990’s sort out the Seattle rock scene during its mighty zenith. Use this chart to ascertain the origins of Mudhoney, Mother Love Bone, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, and other such bands. The chart originally appeared here in the September 1992 issue of Spin magazine.

In the video above, Best Coast covers “Storms,” originally performed by Fleetwood Mac, at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta, Georgia on Thursday, July 12, 2012.  Interestingly, Best Coast’s contribution to the upcoming Fleetwood Mac tribute album, Just Tell Me That You Want Me - Tribute To Fleetwood Mac, is a cover of Fleetwood Mac’s “Rhiannon.” (Video taken by the YouTube user thinklia).

The cover of Dazzler #33, published by Marvel Comics in 1984. Note the homage to - or more likely, gratuitous attempt to capitalize upon the recent mega-success of - Michael Jackson’s Thriller LP, which had been released in November of 1982. (“Thriller,” the song and title track from that record, was released as a single on January 23, 1984, while it’s video, Michael Jackson’s Thriller, was released on December 2, 1983.).

The cover of Dazzler #33, published by Marvel Comics in 1984. Note the homage to - or more likely, gratuitous attempt to capitalize upon the recent mega-success of - Michael Jackson’s Thriller LP, which had been released in November of 1982. (“Thriller,” the song and title track from that record, was released as a single on January 23, 1984, while it’s video, Michael Jackson’s Thriller, was released on December 2, 1983.).

A double advertisement for new records from The Mission and The House of Love. This ad originally appeared here in the May 1990 issue of Spin magazine.

A double advertisement for new records from The Mission and The House of Love. This ad originally appeared here in the May 1990 issue of Spin magazine.

Really, I only remember that Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man existed as a film (although Wikipedia informs me that, curiously, the 1991 film was set in the year 1996). Surely, there’s something to say about the perils of product placement when the two components of the film’s title are, in fact, products. But it likely says something about the mediocrity of this film that even that major ethical issue is mostly forgotten two decades later. In fairness, though, the film’s poster does appear to offer viewers a few helpful tips. This ad originally appeared here in the September 1991 issue of Spin magazine.

Really, I only remember that Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man existed as a film (although Wikipedia informs me that, curiously, the 1991 film was set in the year 1996). Surely, there’s something to say about the perils of product placement when the two components of the film’s title are, in fact, products. But it likely says something about the mediocrity of this film that even that major ethical issue is mostly forgotten two decades later. In fairness, though, the film’s poster does appear to offer viewers a few helpful tips. This ad originally appeared here in the September 1991 issue of Spin magazine.

Behold, a photograph of Peter Gabriel, once of Genesis, later of a successful solo career. This photograph originally appeared here in the September 1986 issue of Spin magazine.

Behold, a photograph of Peter Gabriel, once of Genesis, later of a successful solo career. This photograph originally appeared here in the September 1986 issue of Spin magazine.

The cover of Dazzler #29, published by Marvel Comics in 1983. Note the title heroine’s fictional LP, Sounds of Light and Fury, depicted prominently thereupon.

The cover of Dazzler #29, published by Marvel Comics in 1983. Note the title heroine’s fictional LP, Sounds of Light and Fury, depicted prominently thereupon.

Behold, Morrissey, from late 1988! The photograph above, taken by Kevin Cummins, originally appeared here in the April 1989 issue of Spin magazine. In fact, the photograph shows Moz at The Civic Hall in Wolverhampton, England, on December 22, 1988. Here is the setlist for that show, which Andrew Clarke of Spin profiles and reviews in his piece.

Behold, Morrissey, from late 1988! The photograph above, taken by Kevin Cummins, originally appeared here in the April 1989 issue of Spin magazine. In fact, the photograph shows Moz at The Civic Hall in Wolverhampton, England, on December 22, 1988. Here is the setlist for that show, which Andrew Clarke of Spin profiles and reviews in his piece.

The wonderful, wonderful opening theme to the 1980’s television show, “Misfits of Science.” Unfortunately, the program itself could not live up to the promise of the extraordinary theme song which opened the show each week. When reruns aired on cable in the mid-to-late 1990’s, those of us who enjoyed the series as children discovered how truly awful the narrative was. Alas.

Don’t forget! Tonight, Saturday, July 7, 2012, the Dex Romweber Duo will play Snug Habor in Charlotte, North Carolina. Romweber, of course, was one half of the famed North Carolina rock band, Flat Duo Jets. Above, you’ll find the video for “Death of Me,” from the Dex Romweber Duo’s 2011 Is That You In The Blue? album.

Above, you’ll find a Billboard review of a June 17, 1985 concert featuring headliners The Smiths and opening act Billy Bragg. Meat is Murder had just been released only a few months before, and The Queen is Dead would be issued almost exactly a year in the future. “Morrissey was definitely the focal point of the show,” wrote reviewer Kathy Gillis, who also concluded that the band’s lead singer was “surprisingly animated, considering the angst-ridden nature of most of The Smiths’ material.” She also had some good things to say about punk folkster Bragg. The show was held at The Beacon Theatre in New York. The review originally appeared here in the July 6, 1985 issue of Billboard.

Above, you’ll find a Billboard review of a June 17, 1985 concert featuring headliners The Smiths and opening act Billy Bragg. Meat is Murder had just been released only a few months before, and The Queen is Dead would be issued almost exactly a year in the future. “Morrissey was definitely the focal point of the show,” wrote reviewer Kathy Gillis, who also concluded that the band’s lead singer was “surprisingly animated, considering the angst-ridden nature of most of The Smiths’ material.” She also had some good things to say about punk folkster Bragg. The show was held at The Beacon Theatre in New York. The review originally appeared here in the July 6, 1985 issue of Billboard.

The ad above for the mediocre film Encino Man originally appeared here in the June 1992 issue of Spin magazine. However, the accompanying soundtrack, released in May of that year, included a few gems, including “Why’d You Want Me” by the Jesus and Mary Chain, “Wooly Bully” by The Smithereens,” and a cover of LL Cool J’s “Mama Said Knock You Out” by Scatterbrain. The album also featured one of the first solo singles by Motley Crue’s Vince Neil, that being the less than inspiring “You’re Invited But Your Friend Can’t Come,” which had the misfortune of being released after the death of heavy metal at the hands of grunge the previous year.

The ad above for the mediocre film Encino Man originally appeared here in the June 1992 issue of Spin magazine. However, the accompanying soundtrack, released in May of that year, included a few gems, including “Why’d You Want Me” by the Jesus and Mary Chain, “Wooly Bully” by The Smithereens,” and a cover of LL Cool J’s “Mama Said Knock You Out” by Scatterbrain. The album also featured one of the first solo singles by Motley Crue’s Vince Neil, that being the less than inspiring “You’re Invited But Your Friend Can’t Come,” which had the misfortune of being released after the death of heavy metal at the hands of grunge the previous year.

"Episode 23: The Masked Avenger Meets his Match" (A Short Superhero Film directed by then Harvard University student Alistair Isaac, from the year 2000):